Interview: Gerry Bamman

Photo: Gerry BammanQuick – name the only actor who worked with Nicholas Ray and Wim Wenders on Lightning Over Water and John Hughes on Home Alone (the first and the second). Add to this the fact that he was a founding member of Andre Gregory’s Manhattan Project, and is now often seen on television’s Law and Order.

Gerry Bamman is having that rare kind of acting career – success across theatre, film and television, and in wildly different kinds of projects in each medium.

Bamman has received the Obie and Drama League awards, as well as a Drama Desk Nomination for best featured actor for his performance as Richard Nixon in Nixon’s Nixon, a performance that will be seen again this fall in New York. As a founding member of the Manhattan Project, Gerry was in one of the foremost experimental theater companies of the 1970s. Led by Andre Gregory, their production of Alice In Wonderland was performed over 500 times in New York and at festivals around the world.

In this interview, recorded outside the Williamstown Theatre Festival, where Gerry is currently performing, he talks about his approach to different kinds of work, revisiting roles, and how an actor creates.

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2 Responses to “Interview: Gerry Bamman”

  1. thomas wright
    August 28th, 2006 01:50
    1

    I was working with Nick when Jerry came on board, way back in the day. He was always a pretty great actor. I believe I directed him in his first bit in front of a camera, a scene from After the Fall, opposite my then-girlfriend Linda Hamilton. Those two were impossible-they thought they knew everything. Nick jumped in and saved the day. Maybe there is something left of that somewhere on big, old, reel-to-reel, grainy, 1/2 in. b&w vid………… Hey, Danton, so where did all the snows go???????? -tw

  2. Terrence Montgomery
    September 6th, 2009 11:35
    2

    Hi, I am trying to contact Gerry Bamman for stage reading. Any info would be appreciated.
    Thanks

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